Energy generating colored glass opens up new opportunities

Colorful glass panels capable of generating electricity have taken a step closer to becoming fully commercialized.

'Printing' transparent solar cells onto colored glass opens up all sorts of opportunities for buildings to generate energy.

Oxford Photovoltaics, a spin-off clean tech company from Oxford University, has announced a £2 million investment from MTI Partners that will enable it to develop its technology, which enables transparent solar cells to be printed directly onto glass in a range of colors suitable for building facades.

This latest investment will allow the firm to build on its experienced technical and commercial teams and construct its own product development and test facilities at the Begbroke Science Park near Oxford.

Kevin Arthur, ceo of Oxford Photovoltaics said: “Our company is making huge strides in the scale-up and commercialization of this technology, our new product development facility at Begbroke will incorporate state of the art printing techniques to enable us to manufacture larger modules and begin the technology transfer of our new, high efficiency MSSC technology.

“In addition, our new test and qualification facility will fast track our program to deliver modules that meet internationally accepted standards and specifications for photovoltaic products.”

Compared to conventional photovoltaic cells, the technology being developed by Oxford Photovoltaics is claimed to offer a number of advantages including its simple screen printing manufacturing processes, low capital cost of manufacture and ability to create glazing panels in a wide range of colours that can be integrated into the building envelope.

The financing was led by MTI through its UMIP Premier Fund alongside investment from the University of Oxford and a number of private investors.

Compared to conventional photovoltaic cells, the technology being developed by Oxford Photovoltaics is claimed to offer a number of advantages including low capital cost of manufacture.